LUIGIA GARRAPA
PHD
 
[ main reserch interests ]  [ short curridulum ]
[ publications ]  [ projects ]
 
office address: CRIL - PALAZZINA UFFICI - I PIANO - PIAZZA FILIPPO MURATORE, LECCE
email: luigia.garrapa@unisalento.it
phone: +39 0832 335008
fax: +39 0832 335007
Personal Home Page http://ling.uni-konstanz.de/pages/home/garrapa/home_luigia.garrapa.htm
 
Main research interests:
Phonology, morphology, and phonetics of Romance languages; neurophysiological correlates of speech perception in cochlear-implant users vs. normal-hearing children.
 
Short Curriculum:
In the Summer term 2002/2003, she was visiting Erasmus student at the Department of Computational Linguistics and Experimental Phonetics ot the Saarland University in Saarbr�cken (Germany).
In July 2004, she obtained her MA in Foreign Languages and Literatures (English, German, and French) at the University of Salento in Lecce (Italy). Thesis title: �Ricerche sul vocalismo tonico di Cutrofiano e Collepasso (in provincia di Lecce): analisi acustica dei dati� [The stressed vowel system in the dialects of Cutrofiano and Collepasso in the province of Lecce: acoustic analysis of the data]. Supervisors: Prof. Dr. Mirko Grimaldi and Prof. Dr. Barbara Gili-Fivela (University of Salento in Lecce, Italy). Mark: 110/110 e Lode. An excerpt of the MA thesis has been published as �Vocali maschili e femminili fra Salento centrale e Salento meridionale: problemi sincronici per un�analisi diacronica� [Male and female vowels between Central and Southern Salento: synchronic problems for a diachronic analysis] in �Proceedings of 1 Convegno Nazionale dell�AISV� in 2004.
From April 2006 to December 2008, she was Research assistant and Lecturer in Romance Linguistics (Wissenaschaftliche Mitarbeiterin, BAT/IIa) for the project A25 �Morphophonological variation at word edges: Evidence from Romance� (Principal investigator: Prof. Dr. Judith Meinsch�fer) within the special research unit SFB 471 �Variation and evolution in the mental lexicon� (Principal investigator: Prof. Dr. Aditi Lahiri) funded by the German Reserch Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft) at the Department of Linguistics of the University of Konstanz (Germany). In January-March 2009 she obtained an individual research grant [Promotionstipendium der Exzellenzinitiative, 3 F�rderlinie, Gender Issues] funded the Gleichstellungsrat of the University of Konstanz for research activity at the Department of Linguistics of the Universit�t of Konstanz.
In October 2009, she obtained her first PhD in Linguistics at the Department of Linguistics of the University of Konstanz (Germany) and the University of Salento in Lecce (Italy), joint-PhD (Supervisors: Prof. Dr. Judith Meinsch�fer of the University of W�rtzburg and Konstanz, Prof. Dr. Janet Grijzenhout of the University of Konstanz, and Prof. Dr. Mirko Grimaldi of the University of Salento in Lecce), Mark: Magna cum laude. In October 2011, she published the research monograph �Vowel elision in Florentine Italian� (a revised version of her PhD thesis) with Peter Lang in the series �Europ�ische Hochschulschriften � Italienische Sprache und Literatur / European University Studies - Italian Language and Literature 50� (ISBN:978-3-0343-1074-1).
In January 2010, she has started her second PhD in Linguistics (still ongoing) at the Department of Linguistics Literature (DiSLL) of the University of Padova (Italy) and at the Centro di Ricerca Interdisciplinare sul Linguaggio (CRIL) of the University of Salento in Lecce (Italy). Joint PhD funded by the University of Padova. The second PhD thesis title is �The behavioural and neurophysiologic correlates of vowel processing by Italian cochlear-implant and normal-hearing children�. Supervisors: Prof. Dr. Laura Vanelli (University of Padova, Italy), Prof. Dr. Mirko Grimaldi (University of Salento, Italy), and Prof. Dr. Andrea Calabrese (University of Connecticut, USA).
Complete Curriculum
 
Publications:
 
Projects:


The behavioral and neurophysiologic correlates of vowel processing in Italian cochlear-implant and normal-hearing children.
Unilateral cochlear implants (henceforth, CI) partially restore auditory sensation in children affected by congenital, bilateral, and severe to profound neurosensorial hearing loss, especially if the CI surgery takes place during the sensitive period for central auditory pathway maturation (until 44months) [Bishof 2007]. For the first time, this study investigates detection, identification, and discrimination of /i, u, e, o, a/ in a group of congenitally-deaf, early-implanted, Italian children (mean age at CI surgery: 33 months, mean age at testing: 109 months), wearing their CI on their right ear, and in a group of age-matched controls (henceforth NH children) living in the province of Lecce (Apulia, Southern Italy). Vowel detection, identification, and discrimination will be investigated by combining behavioral measures (active vowel identification and discrimination tasks) and neurophysiologic measures (passive EEG recording and extraction of the P1, N1, MMN, and P3a responses evoked by vowel presentation) [Korkzac et al. 2005; Purdy et al. 2005; Martin et al. 2008]. The aim of this study is twofold. First, we want to ascertain whether or not Italian CI children detect, identify, and discriminate vowels building on a time window and an accuracy comparable to those exhibited by NH children, both at the behavioral and at the neurophysiologic levels. Second, we aim at determining whether, and to what extent, age at surgery (mean: 33months, range: 23-54months) and length of CI use (mean: 76months, range: 28-97months) affect vowel processing in early-implanted Italian children. Building on the results achieved by previous ERP studies on CI children exposed to English, French, Dutch, and Finnish [Sharma et al. 2005, 2007, 2009; Beynon et al. 2002; Singh et al. 2004; Henkin et al. 2008], we expect Italian CI children to need a prolonged time window and/or to rely on a lower accuracy in vowel processing with respect to NH children, both at the behavioral and at the neurophysiologic levels. We also expect those Italian deaf children who received their CI earlier and/or who benefit from a longer CI use to process vowels more quickly and more accurately compared to the other CI children. The international research group consists of Dr. Luigia Garrapa (University of Padova and University of Salento, Italy), Prof. Mirko Grimaldi (University of Salento, Italy), Dr. Davide Bottari (University of Hamburg, Germany), Prof. Francesco Pavani (University of Trento, Italy), Prof. Andrea Calabrese (University of Connecticut, USA), Dr. Michele De Benedetto (UOC of ORL, Hospital �Fazzi� in Lecce), and Dr. Silvano Vitale (UOC of ORL, Hospital �Fazzi� in Lecce).


Cortical vowel processing in typically-developing Italian children: an ERP study.
In typically-developing individuals, the auditory cortex is responsible for speech sound processing. Identification and discrimination of native speech sounds takes place when native vowels and consonants are recognized and their long-term memory representations, stored in the auditory cortex, are activated [Pulverm�ller & Shyrov 2006; N��t�nen et al. 2011]. Speech sound processing (i.e. detection, identification, and discrimination) at the level of the auditory cortex can be easily investigated by means of the auditory Event-Related Potentials (ERPs), both in normal and pathologic, adult and pediatric subjects [Kujala et al. 2007; Martin et al. 2008; N��t�nen et al. 2011; Duncan et al. 2010]. Passively recorded ERPs are brain responses automatically elicited by auditory sounds (typically speech) and they provide information regarding the timing (through ERP latency, measured in milliseconds), accuracy (through ERP amplitude, measured in microvolts), hemisphere involvement (through scalp topography of ERP latency and amplitude), and neuronal activation (through ERP duration) in speech sound processing. For the first time, this study investigates the neurophysiological correlates of cortical processing (i.e. detection, identification, and discrimination) of 5 Italian vowels (/i, u, e, o, a/) in Southern Italian school-age children (mean age at testing: 92 months, range: 51-131 months), all right-handed. Three ERP components are of intetest in this study: the P1, N1, and MMN responses. The P1 and N1 responses indicate that vowels have been detected and identified, in turn [Sharma et al. 2005; Hyde 1997; N��t�nen et al. 2011]. The MMN response indexes that vowels have been recognized as native phonemes and phonetically discriminated with respect to their acoustic and articulatory characteristics [N��t�nen et al. 2011]. Crucially, the parameters of the N1 and MMN responses appear to be modulated by the vowel-specific acoustic features [Obleser et al. 2003; Scharinger et al. 2012]. The aim of this study is threefold. First, we will provide the exact parameters (i.e. the peak latency and amplitude as well as the component duration) of the P1, N1, and MMN responses evoked by Italian vowels in typically-developing, school-age children. The P1, N1, and MMN parameters detailed in this study may be used as a reference for future work on speech sound processing in typically-developing or patologic Italian children. Second, we will investigate scalp distribution of the P1, N1, and MMN responses over the left and the right hemispheres in order to ascertain whether or not the left hemisphere in more involved in speech sound processing in right-handed children. Third, we will determine whether, and to what extent, the N1 and MMN parameters are vowel-specific in terms of latency, amplitude, and duration as well as whether some vowels which are processed more rapidly or evoke ERP components endowed with a higher amplitude and/or a longer duration compared to other vowels. The international research group is formed by Dr. Luigia Garrapa (University of Padova and University of Salento, Italy), Prof. Mirko Grimaldi (University of Salento, Italy), Dr. Davide Bottari (University of Hamburg, Germany), Prof. Francesco Pavani (University of Trento, Italy), Prof. Andrea Calabrese (University of Connecticut, USA), Dr. Michele De Benedetto (UOC of ORL, Hospital �Fazzi� in Lecce), and Dr. Silvano Vitale (UOC of ORL, Hospital �Fazzi� in Lecce).

 
 
Last modified 27/10/2016
© 2006-2018 Centro di Ricerca Interdisciplinare sul Linguaggio - Webmaster